Amphibians

For the Love of... Herps?

For the Love of... Herps?

My second week here in Malaysia began much the same way as the first ended. Sitting on the edge of the road, camera set up and trained on the little birds nest just inside the forest. After three more long days of surveys, as much as I was fascinated by the potential new discovery that we were recording with the two female Black Naped monarchs brooding the nest, I was ready to get back to Merapoh and start preparing for the special weekend ahead!

As some of you that have followed Life Gone Wild for a little while may have picked up, while I love aaaall animals, I do have a particular passion for herpetofauna (reptiles and amphibians). My previous experience in Merapoh had yielded a grand total of 1 snake and a few species of frogs. Effectively nothing. So it was with great excitement that I prepared for the arrival of Dr Teo Eng Wah (Known as Vince in the photography world) and Muhammad Khaidhir Ariff (Boy), an excellent herp photographer and a snake handler (who apparently is able to free handle a King Cobra!). They were coming to help us kick off a new project looking at the herpetofaunal biodiversity of Merapoh and the Sungai Yu Forest Reserve. To say that I was hoping to increase those earlier numbers exponentially would be an understatement.

Ensuring the Survival of One Remarkable Little Frog

Ensuring the Survival of One Remarkable Little Frog

When I was a child dreaming of helping animals (as Steve Irwin, of course) all sorts of creatures were at the forefront of my mind. But there was one kind of animal that very rarely featured in little Angus’ mind: frogs. Now, after my time in Madagascar, I have a whole new appreciation for these incredible little fellas, who need all the help we can get. SO! In this post we have a doozy of an amphibian! Prepare yourself to meet the one, the only, the incredible lemur leaf frog!

In the Throes of Pygmy Toes!

In the Throes of Pygmy Toes!

Getting down and dirty to find some stump-toed, tiny frogs!

My favourite thing about working on Nosy Komba was being able to head out into the forest and conduct herpetofauna (reptile and amphibian) surveys EVERY DAY. At 6:30 every morning, we would leave the comfort of camp and hike to one of MRCI's 10 survey sites. Even at that time in the morning, the forests of Nosy Komba were teeming with life. We’d find an assortment of astonishing animals every walk: chameleons, geckos, snakes, frogs, birds, and lemurs, and that was before the survey!